Tuesday, April 22, 2014

Researchers Turn to Google, Libraries Navigate

As researchers turn to Google, libraries navigate the messy world of discovery tools. Many professors and students gravitate to Google as a gateway to research. Libraries want to offer them a comparably simple and broad experience for searching academic content. As a result, a major change is under way in how libraries organize information. Instead of bewildering users with a bevy of specialized databases—books here, articles there—many libraries are bulldozing their digital silos. They now offer one-stop search boxes that comb entire collections, Google style. That’s the ideal, anyway. The reality is turning out to be messier. The rise of these "discovery" tools, which mine giant indexes of aggregated content, is generating new tensions. Because some companies that make the search tools are also in the content business, selling article databases and other material to libraries, one fear is that firms could favor their own content in results. Another is that discovery software, by sluicing content together, could deluge users with less-appropriate resources. Either way, they could miss relevant articles.  (More at http://bit.ly/1k4Bo2Q The Chronicle of Higher Education, April 21, Technology)  

Wednesday, April 16, 2014

Researcher examines Spanish Inquisition



A KU history professor uncovered detailed notes from a little-known, 436-year-old case in the Spanish Inquisition and says it provides an important look into a world without freedom of religion and other staples of a democratic society. Themes of the case and the Inquisition are still relevant today in discussions about the limits of power on institutions or human rights, Luis Corteguera, a KU professor of history, says.  Full story is here: http://bit.ly/QaCpfb

Thursday, April 10, 2014

School of Social Welfare marks anniversary of Strengths Perspective

LAWRENCE — The University of Kansas is commemorating the anniversary of a school of thought that not only put the School of Social Welfare on the map, it changed social work and education across the globe. KU is marking the 25th anniversary of a seminal publication touting the Strengths Perspective, a revolutionary way of approaching social work. The perspective has helped individuals recover from mental health, substance abuse and numerous other issues in a way that previously hadn’t been done. “For the preceding century at least, social work looked at as ‘what’s your problem, and how do we solve it,’” said Alice Lieberman, professor of social welfare and director of the bachelor’s of social welfare program. “This really turned that model on its head as helping professionals began to inventory not only the talents and resources of the client, but their dreams and aspirations. No one ever solved their problems with resources they didn’t have, and no one has ever realized their potential by relentlessly focusing on their problems.” - See more at: http://bit.ly/1jofTJW

Thursday, April 03, 2014

Subject and Course Guides

Need online research help? Subject and Course Guides are located on the KU Libraries' Homepage.  Select the link and the screen opens to an index of available subjects with a course guide. For example, if you are doing research in Social Welfare, the subject page is alphabetically placed in the index. Select "Social Welfare" and from here click on "Information Resources for Social Workers." Note the items listed on the first screen of resources are designated as "Starting Points". These are up front because of their importance to the student of Social Work. Need to find an article? Select Social Work Abstracts. How about a definition and description of  "single parent homes"? Look for this in the Encyclopedia of Social Work. You can even get Government Documents and find Statistics from the Social Welfare Subject Guide. These guides are excellent tools for your research and travel with you throughout your academic career as you login with your KU ID and password.

Monday, March 31, 2014

Jobs susceptible to computerisation



The Future of Employment: How Susceptible Are Jobs to Computerisation?  “Nearly half of US jobs could be susceptible to computerisation over the next two decades, a study from the Oxford Martin Programme on the Impacts of Future Technology suggests. The study, a collaboration between Dr Carl Benedikt Frey (Oxford Martin School) and Dr Michael A. Osborne(Department of Engineering Science, University of Oxford), found that jobs in transportation, logistics, as well as office and administrative support, are at “high risk” of automation. More surprisingly, occupations within the service industry are also highly susceptible, despite recent job growth in this sector. “We identified several key bottlenecks currently preventing occupations being automated,” says Dr. Osborne. “As big data helps to overcome these obstacles, a great number of jobs will be put at risk.” The study examined over 700 detailed occupation types, noting the types of tasks workers perform and the skills required. By weighting these factors, as well as the engineering obstacles currently preventing computerisation, the researchers assessed the degree to which these occupations may be automated in the coming decades. “Our findings imply that as technology races ahead, low-skilled workers will move to tasks that are not susceptible to computerisation — i.e., tasks that required creative and social intelligence,” the paper states. “For workers to win the race, however, they will have to acquire creative and social skills.” Dr Frey said the United Kingdom is expected to face a similar challenge to the US. “While our analysis was based on detailed datasets relating to US occupations, the implications are likely to extend to employment in the UK and other developed countries,” he said.”  (info from http://www.bespacific.com )

Wednesday, March 26, 2014

Guide addresses spirituality in recovery

Spirituality, faith and religion can be challenging to incorporate in helping people with mental health recovery. A University of Kansas professor and his team have developed a brochure and website to help mental health providers around the world sensitively address spirituality and determine how it can help people recover.
Edward Canda, professor of social welfare and courtesy professor of religious studies, led the project by The Spiritual Diversity and Social Work Initiative and The Center for Mental Health Research and Innovation at KU’s School of Social Welfare. 
“We felt it was important to create a very user-friendly guide for providers so they could get a sense, very quickly, of the significance of spirituality and how it fits the Strengths Model for promoting mental health recovery,” Canda said. “My hope is to make a contribution to the mental health community that anyone can access.”
The Strengths Model is an approach to mental health recovery developed at KU in the mid- to late-1980s and has become influential nationally and internationally. It focuses on identifying an individual’s strengths and resources to aid recovery instead of dwelling on the problem or focusing on negative aspects while looking for solutions. The model assesses life domains, including home/daily living, assets, employment/education, supportive relationships, wellness/health, leisure/recreation and spirituality/culture. The spirituality aspect of the latter domain is the most commonly misunderstood, and it is rare for mental health providers to have any training in that area, Canda said. Providers are often uncomfortable discussing it as they feel they may be unintentionally imposing or misunderstanding certain beliefs.
The new brochure, available online http://bit.ly/1dsmcwA gives providers an overview of how spirituality can aid in understanding mental health challenges and helping individuals recover.[More -- http://bit.ly/1haRasp] from KU Today 3/26
Spirituality, faith and religion can be challenging to incorporate in helping people with mental health recovery. A University of Kansas professor and his team have developed a brochure and website to help mental health providers around the world sensitively address spirituality and determine how it can help people recover.
Edward Canda, professor of social welfare and courtesy professor of religious studies, led the project by The Spiritual Diversity and Social Work Initiative and The Center for Mental Health Research and Innovation at KU’s School of Social Welfare.
“We felt it was important to create a very user-friendly guide for providers so they could get a sense, very quickly, of the significance of spirituality and how it fits the Strengths Model for promoting mental health recovery,” Canda said. “My hope is to make a contribution to the mental health community that anyone can access.”
The Strengths Model is an approach to mental health recovery developed at KU in the mid- to late-1980s and has become influential nationally and internationally. It focuses on identifying an individual’s strengths and resources to aid recovery instead of dwelling on the problem or focusing on negative aspects while looking for solutions. The model assesses life domains, including home/daily living, assets, employment/education, supportive relationships, wellness/health, leisure/recreation and spirituality/culture. The spirituality aspect of the latter domain is the most commonly misunderstood, and it is rare for mental health providers to have any training in that area, Canda said. Providers are often uncomfortable discussing it as they feel they may be unintentionally imposing or misunderstanding certain beliefs.
The new brochure, available online gives providers an overview of how spirituality can aid in understanding mental health challenges and helping individuals recover.
- See more at: http://news.ku.edu/2014/02/26/ku-research-team-makes-guide-spirituality-mental-health-recovery-available-social-workers#sthash.62hQFqKI.dpuf
Spirituality, faith and religion can be challenging to incorporate in helping people with mental health recovery. A University of Kansas professor and his team have developed a brochure and website to help mental health providers around the world sensitively address spirituality and determine how it can help people recover.
Edward Canda, professor of social welfare and courtesy professor of religious studies, led the project by The Spiritual Diversity and Social Work Initiative and The Center for Mental Health Research and Innovation at KU’s School of Social Welfare.
“We felt it was important to create a very user-friendly guide for providers so they could get a sense, very quickly, of the significance of spirituality and how it fits the Strengths Model for promoting mental health recovery,” Canda said. “My hope is to make a contribution to the mental health community that anyone can access.”
The Strengths Model is an approach to mental health recovery developed at KU in the mid- to late-1980s and has become influential nationally and internationally. It focuses on identifying an individual’s strengths and resources to aid recovery instead of dwelling on the problem or focusing on negative aspects while looking for solutions. The model assesses life domains, including home/daily living, assets, employment/education, supportive relationships, wellness/health, leisure/recreation and spirituality/culture. The spirituality aspect of the latter domain is the most commonly misunderstood, and it is rare for mental health providers to have any training in that area, Canda said. Providers are often uncomfortable discussing it as they feel they may be unintentionally imposing or misunderstanding certain beliefs.
The new brochure, available online gives providers an overview of how spirituality can aid in understanding mental health challenges and helping individuals recover.
- See more at: http://news.ku.edu/2014/02/26/ku-research-team-makes-guide-spirituality-mental-health-recovery-available-social-workers#sthash.62hQFqKI.dpuf
Spirituality, faith and religion can be challenging to incorporate in helping people with mental health recovery. A University of Kansas professor and his team have developed a brochure and website to help mental health providers around the world sensitively address spirituality and determine how it can help people recover.
Edward Canda, professor of social welfare and courtesy professor of religious studies, led the project by The Spiritual Diversity and Social Work Initiative and The Center for Mental Health Research and Innovation at KU’s School of Social Welfare.
“We felt it was important to create a very user-friendly guide for providers so they could get a sense, very quickly, of the significance of spirituality and how it fits the Strengths Model for promoting mental health recovery,” Canda said. “My hope is to make a contribution to the mental health community that anyone can access.”
The Strengths Model is an approach to mental health recovery developed at KU in the mid- to late-1980s and has become influential nationally and internationally. It focuses on identifying an individual’s strengths and resources to aid recovery instead of dwelling on the problem or focusing on negative aspects while looking for solutions. The model assesses life domains, including home/daily living, assets, employment/education, supportive relationships, wellness/health, leisure/recreation and spirituality/culture. The spirituality aspect of the latter domain is the most commonly misunderstood, and it is rare for mental health providers to have any training in that area, Canda said. Providers are often uncomfortable discussing it as they feel they may be unintentionally imposing or misunderstanding certain beliefs.
The new brochure, available online gives providers an overview of how spirituality can aid in understanding mental health challenges and helping individuals recover.
- See more at: http://news.ku.edu/2014/02/26/ku-research-team-makes-guide-spirituality-mental-health-recovery-available-social-workers#sthash.62hQFqKI.dpuf
Spirituality, faith and religion can be challenging to incorporate in helping people with mental health recovery. A University of Kansas professor and his team have developed a brochure and website to help mental health providers around the world sensitively address spirituality and determine how it can help people recover.
Edward Canda, professor of social welfare and courtesy professor of religious studies, led the project by The Spiritual Diversity and Social Work Initiative and The Center for Mental Health Research and Innovation at KU’s School of Social Welfare.
“We felt it was important to create a very user-friendly guide for providers so they could get a sense, very quickly, of the significance of spirituality and how it fits the Strengths Model for promoting mental health recovery,” Canda said. “My hope is to make a contribution to the mental health community that anyone can access.”
The Strengths Model is an approach to mental health recovery developed at KU in the mid- to late-1980s and has become influential nationally and internationally. It focuses on identifying an individual’s strengths and resources to aid recovery instead of dwelling on the problem or focusing on negative aspects while looking for solutions. The model assesses life domains, including home/daily living, assets, employment/education, supportive relationships, wellness/health, leisure/recreation and spirituality/culture. The spirituality aspect of the latter domain is the most commonly misunderstood, and it is rare for mental health providers to have any training in that area, Canda said. Providers are often uncomfortable discussing it as they feel they may be unintentionally imposing or misunderstanding certain beliefs.
The new brochure, available online gives providers an overview of how spirituality can aid in understanding mental health challenges and helping individuals recover.
- See more at: http://news.ku.edu/2014/02/26/ku-research-team-makes-guide-spirituality-mental-health-recovery-available-social-workers#sthash.62hQFqKI.dpuf
Spirituality, faith and religion can be challenging to incorporate in helping people with mental health recovery. A University of Kansas professor and his team have developed a brochure and website to help mental health providers around the world sensitively address spirituality and determine how it can help people recover.
Edward Canda, professor of social welfare and courtesy professor of religious studies, led the project by The Spiritual Diversity and Social Work Initiative and The Center for Mental Health Research and Innovation at KU’s School of Social Welfare.
“We felt it was important to create a very user-friendly guide for providers so they could get a sense, very quickly, of the significance of spirituality and how it fits the Strengths Model for promoting mental health recovery,” Canda said. “My hope is to make a contribution to the mental health community that anyone can access.”
The Strengths Model is an approach to mental health recovery developed at KU in the mid- to late-1980s and has become influential nationally and internationally. It focuses on identifying an individual’s strengths and resources to aid recovery instead of dwelling on the problem or focusing on negative aspects while looking for solutions. The model assesses life domains, including home/daily living, assets, employment/education, supportive relationships, wellness/health, leisure/recreation and spirituality/culture. The spirituality aspect of the latter domain is the most commonly misunderstood, and it is rare for mental health providers to have any training in that area, Canda said. Providers are often uncomfortable discussing it as they feel they may be unintentionally imposing or misunderstanding certain beliefs.
The new brochure, available online gives providers an overview of how spirituality can aid in understanding mental health challenges and helping individuals recover.
- See more at: http://news.ku.edu/2014/02/26/ku-research-team-makes-guide-spirituality-mental-health-recovery-available-social-workers#sthash.62hQFqKI.dpuf
Spirituality, faith and religion can be challenging to incorporate in helping people with mental health recovery. A University of Kansas professor and his team have developed a brochure and website to help mental health providers around the world sensitively address spirituality and determine how it can help people recover.
Edward Canda, professor of social welfare and courtesy professor of religious studies, led the project by The Spiritual Diversity and Social Work Initiative and The Center for Mental Health Research and Innovation at KU’s School of Social Welfare.
“We felt it was important to create a very user-friendly guide for providers so they could get a sense, very quickly, of the significance of spirituality and how it fits the Strengths Model for promoting mental health recovery,” Canda said. “My hope is to make a contribution to the mental health community that anyone can access.”
The Strengths Model is an approach to mental health recovery developed at KU in the mid- to late-1980s and has become influential nationally and internationally. It focuses on identifying an individual’s strengths and resources to aid recovery instead of dwelling on the problem or focusing on negative aspects while looking for solutions. The model assesses life domains, including home/daily living, assets, employment/education, supportive relationships, wellness/health, leisure/recreation and spirituality/culture. The spirituality aspect of the latter domain is the most commonly misunderstood, and it is rare for mental health providers to have any training in that area, Canda said. Providers are often uncomfortable discussing it as they feel they may be unintentionally imposing or misunderstanding certain beliefs.
The new brochure, available online gives providers an overview of how spirituality can aid in understanding mental health challenges and helping individuals recover.
- See more at: http://news.ku.edu/2014/02/26/ku-research-team-makes-guide-spirituality-mental-health-recovery-available-social-workers#sthash.62hQFqKI.dpuf
Spirituality, faith and religion can be challenging to incorporate in helping people with mental health recovery. A University of Kansas professor and his team have developed a brochure and website to help mental health providers around the world sensitively address spirituality and determine how it can help people recover.
Edward Canda, professor of social welfare and courtesy professor of religious studies, led the project by The Spiritual Diversity and Social Work Initiative and The Center for Mental Health Research and Innovation at KU’s School of Social Welfare.
“We felt it was important to create a very user-friendly guide for providers so they could get a sense, very quickly, of the significance of spirituality and how it fits the Strengths Model for promoting mental health recovery,” Canda said. “My hope is to make a contribution to the mental health community that anyone can access.”
The Strengths Model is an approach to mental health recovery developed at KU in the mid- to late-1980s and has become influential nationally and internationally. It focuses on identifying an individual’s strengths and resources to aid recovery instead of dwelling on the problem or focusing on negative aspects while looking for solutions. The model assesses life domains, including home/daily living, assets, employment/education, supportive relationships, wellness/health, leisure/recreation and spirituality/culture. The spirituality aspect of the latter domain is the most commonly misunderstood, and it is rare for mental health providers to have any training in that area, Canda said. Providers are often uncomfortable discussing it as they feel they may be unintentionally imposing or misunderstanding certain beliefs.
The new brochure, available online gives providers an overview of how spirituality can aid in understanding mental health challenges and helping individuals recover.
- See more at: http://news.ku.edu/2014/02/26/ku-research-team-makes-guide-spirituality-mental-health-recovery-available-social-workers#sthash.62hQFqKI.dpuf
Spirituality, faith and religion can be challenging to incorporate in helping people with mental health recovery. A University of Kansas professor and his team have developed a brochure and website to help mental health providers around the world sensitively address spirituality and determine how it can help people recover.
Edward Canda, professor of social welfare and courtesy professor of religious studies, led the project by The Spiritual Diversity and Social Work Initiative and The Center for Mental Health Research and Innovation at KU’s School of Social Welfare.
“We felt it was important to create a very user-friendly guide for providers so they could get a sense, very quickly, of the significance of spirituality and how it fits the Strengths Model for promoting mental health recovery,” Canda said. “My hope is to make a contribution to the mental health community that anyone can access.”
The Strengths Model is an approach to mental health recovery developed at KU in the mid- to late-1980s and has become influential nationally and internationally. It focuses on identifying an individual’s strengths and resources to aid recovery instead of dwelling on the problem or focusing on negative aspects while looking for solutions. The model assesses life domains, including home/daily living, assets, employment/education, supportive relationships, wellness/health, leisure/recreation and spirituality/culture. The spirituality aspect of the latter domain is the most commonly misunderstood, and it is rare for mental health providers to have any training in that area, Canda said. Providers are often uncomfortable discussing it as they feel they may be unintentionally imposing or misunderstanding certain beliefs.
The new brochure, available online gives providers an overview of how spirituality can aid in understanding mental health challenges and helping individuals recover.
- See more at: http://news.ku.edu/2014/02/26/ku-research-team-makes-guide-spirituality-mental-health-recovery-available-social-workers#sthash.62hQFqKI.dpuf